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Suppose we had a metallic element that was capable of blocking a particular part of the electromagnetic spectrum in its solid state. If the metal was fully melted to its liquid state and remained enveloped around a space, would it still function as a Faraday Cage?

If so, suppose it was heated even further into a gaseous state and trapped in a non-conductive container, would it still function as a faraday cage around all the interior objects it envelopes? Is the gas density also a factor?

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In principle, yes, a fluid Faraday cage is possible. For example, re-entering spacecraft create a plasma around themselves that blocks radio. Plasma does not block all frequencies; there is a cut off that depends on density, with denser plasmas able to block higher frequency waves.

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    $\begingroup$ Of course, a plasma is pretty different from a gas when it comes to electromagnetic interactions. $\endgroup$
    – EL_DON
    Sep 4 '17 at 5:41
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Based on one of the answers above I found this comparing a plasma sheath from space reentry to a Faraday Cage. The author explicitly says they are not the same, although the plasma sheath can certainly masquerade as a Faraday Cage for low frequencies.

https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_does_the_plasma_sheath_affect_the_propagation_of_radio_waves

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you arguing that plasma is not a Faraday cage because you're defining a cage as being made out of some sort of mesh (in which case we could call it a Faraday shield instead), or because plasmas are never completely perfect conductors? $\endgroup$
    – EL_DON
    Sep 6 '17 at 12:31

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