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I Learned Kirchhoff's circuit rules and RLC circuit at school, but there wasn't the integration of those two concepts. Kirchhoff's circuit rules were applyed only in direct current and the RLC was the another situation. So my question is, said in the title, can alternating current be explained by Kirchhoff 's circuit rules?

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The Kirchhoff Laws are just derived from the equation of continuity (KCL) and Faraday's Law (KVL) under the assumption that nodes do not bear any charge (nodes that do bear electric charge are abstracted into capacitors) and that the magnetic flux through a circuit loop does not change, or that there is none (circuit loops behaving otherwise are abstracted into inductors, transformer coils, etc.).

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Kirchhoff's circuit rules is just another way of saying conservation of the conducting charges. It's true no matter you're discussing RLC or direct current. I don't see why you say it is different for these two

I guess you might misunderstand that alternating circuit is ever-changing (so that you might have thought charges don't conserve): That's a another matter, the conducting charges still conserve, nor accumulating or dissipating (at the circuit node). Still, the Kirchhoff's law apply to circuit node at every instant.

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  • $\begingroup$ Kirchhoff's circuit rules is just another way of saying conservation of the conducting charges. There are two rules. Only one has to do with charge conservation. $\endgroup$ – Ben Crowell Aug 22 '17 at 15:39
  • $\begingroup$ Since the original post seems to deal with current, I am referring to the current version of kirchhoff's law $\endgroup$ – Math The Novice Aug 22 '17 at 15:49

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