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I was looking at the double slit experiment and how the reduction in slit size (delta x) increased the variation in momentum (delta p). These values are bounded by Heisenberg's uncertainty's principle. Currently we assume that it happens purely due to mathematical equivalence. However, could it be possible that the electrons get more deflected as the electric field gets stronger between the two sides of the slit?

The walls of the slit could act as slightly charged plates, causing a randomly fluctuating electric field between them. As they are made smaller, the space decreases, increasing the field strength. This could lead to the higher deflections too. Could this be a possible explanation?

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The double slit experiment is the solution of the quantum mechanical setup: " electron scattering off two slits", the width and distances of the slits are the boundary values one has to use to compare with the data.

You are correct that the fields of the materials on which the slits are drawn play a role, because microscopically what is happening as an electron approaches the two slits virtual photons are exchanged as in all scatterings, in this case with the spill over electric fields of the atoms at the edges of the slit. (have a look at this link for simple presentation of Feynman diagrams)

The Heisenberg uncertainty principle is a shorthand physical observation for what are relations between variables, mathematically rigorously described with commutator relations.

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  • $\begingroup$ Upvote for a detailed explanation. $\endgroup$
    – safesphere
    Aug 18, 2017 at 5:23

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