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In eternal (time independent) Schwarzschild black hole contains a wormhole called an Einstein-Rosen bridge. But since no real black hole is eternal, real black holes do not contain any wormholes. So by predicating your question on black holes you have eliminated any physical relevance from it. – John Rennie

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This question is based on Wormholes and Blackholes

The question cited above was based in part, on our confidence of the validity of any hypothesis regarding wormholes, arising from black hole creation.

My naive questions are based on mass produced gravitational effects, (rather than asking about spacetime curvature), so I am aware I could be looking at this from the wrong perspective.

Are there logical conclusions (not opinions, simply just answers to the question "is it logical to conclude X") that can be drawn from the answers given to the cited question above.

These hopefully "logical conclusions" from the gravitational effects of black holes are simply stated:

  1. The remnant mass of the original star acts as if the star was still there, in the sense of it's gravitational effect remains unchanged at a arbitrary distance from the black hole. So there is no wormhole.

  2. There is a wormhole, but it is "connected" to somewhere in our universe, so through some (mainstream allowed) mechanism, we can still feel the gravity of the mass associated with the black hole? Again, is it logical to say this would add support, even extremely indirectly, to whatever the real reason(s) are behind superluminal properties?

  3. There is a wormhole, but it connects to another universe.

No, I don't like that conclusion any more than probably most users do, but can the point below be used to bolster the case against any other universe existing, other than our own?

In other words, (and I want avoid answers involving semantics regarding the word universe), if there is a wormhole, it must "connect" with our universe, as I cannot see how gravitions, spacetime curvature, entanglement, non locality, etc., in another universe can affect events in our universe.

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  • $\begingroup$ Note that my answer to the referenced question said that I suspect traversable wormholes are just toy models. However I would be happy to be wrong about that. $\endgroup$ – tfb Aug 10 '17 at 20:50
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    $\begingroup$ Oh, no, I think it's a fine question: I was just explaining why I probably don't have any good answer! $\endgroup$ – tfb Aug 10 '17 at 21:19
  • $\begingroup$ For clarification, are you asking about the wormhole that exists in the maximally extended Schwarzschild black hole? It sounds that way since you seem to be talking about wormholes in the context of a collapsing star. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 11 '17 at 11:41
  • $\begingroup$ @Countto10: an eternal (time independent) Schwarzschild black hole contains a wormhole called an Einstein-Rosen bridge. But since no real black hole is eternal, real black holes do not contain any wormholes. So by predicating your question on black holes you have eliminated any physical relevance from it. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 11 '17 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ @Countto10: is Are wormholes really a valid shortcut to distant points in the universe? of any interest? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Aug 11 '17 at 15:08

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