-4
$\begingroup$

I have a theoretical question regarding the disconnect between the quantum world and the standard physical world and the inability to combine the two.

My question is simple.

Is it possible that the reason we have not been able to combine the two is because the rules governing them are based in different realities/dimensions? The standard model of physics is the basis of how we determine our reality in this dimension. When the quantum world model is based on a whole different set of rules that may be governed on a model from an alternative dimension or reality. However it is needed to be utilised within our own universe to interpret much like a program or translator does to make an Apple program work on a Mac computer. Is it possible that the quantum world is making these interpretations for us. Which may explain why we have found it so hard to combine the theory as we are only seeing half of the picture?

This obviously ask more and more questions like if this may be the case then who or what is driving this communication between dimensions and what for? And so on.

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by WillO, John Rennie, Yashas, AccidentalFourierTransform, ZeroTheHero Aug 5 '17 at 12:10

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Just as a heads up this is probably a duplicate, it's a common thought. Also, completely wrong use of the word dimension. Dimension refers to the number of directions. $\endgroup$ – tox123 Aug 5 '17 at 0:51
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ If you want to talk about the standard model for psychics, you should go to a psychics web page. $\endgroup$ – The Photon Aug 5 '17 at 0:52
  • $\begingroup$ @ThePhoton that is not really fair, imo, but Bryce, you are asking a philosophy question and I think Philosophy SE would welcome this. Almost anything you say in your question is possible, AFAIK, but definitely not a job for physics to answer, luckily enough. $\endgroup$ – user163104 Aug 5 '17 at 1:28
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Countto10 For a good description of Theory of Everything Not Appearing In Labs (TOENAIL) see insti.physics.sunysb.edu/~siegel/parodies/next.html $\endgroup$ – ZeroTheHero Aug 5 '17 at 11:19
  • $\begingroup$ @ZeroTheHero excellent, thank you very much. I have downloaded it. I told you earlier I was on vacation, but I forgot two important things: Wi-Fi is ubiquitous and internet addiction (but just to this site, luckily), is a terrible, terrible affliction.... $\endgroup$ – user163104 Aug 5 '17 at 11:33
2
$\begingroup$

It's a common misunderstanding that there is a "disconnect" between quantum mechanics and classical physics. There is no disconnect and they are perfectly in sync. Quantum mechanics describes the world in more details while classical physics drops the details that are insignificant to us at the macroscopic level and leaves the statistical averages that make up the familiar world we see around.

Sometimes quantum mechanical effects become visible in the classical world and they are always amazing. Arguably a magnet is not really a classical object. Its magnetic field is created by electrons rotating in their atoms. We take magnets for granted, but just imagine that you've never seen any, then how amazing it would be to see. Other examples include laser light, superconductivity, superfluidity, and more.

Finally, as we make devices smaller and smaller, such as millions of tiny transistors inside computer processors or memory chips, we are entering the quantum world. The design of modern processors already accounts for quantum effects in their circuitry.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

To answer the misunderstanding:

I have a theoretical question regarding the disconnect between the quantum world and the standard physical world and the inability to combine the two.

Who said there is a disconnect? The mathematical models blend smoothly from the quantum fields to the classical fields. See this analysis by Lubos Motl, for example. Also the use of the density matrix shows how for large dimensions classical behavior is reached.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.