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Current is a scalar quantity. In Watt-less current, we divide current into components like vectors. Moreover, when AC current passes through inductors or capacitors, we put a vector sign over current. Can anyone please elaborate?

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, not sure why you are sure that current is a scalar quantity. I may have forgotten undergraduate physics course, but as far as I know, one of the definitions of the current is $\vec{I} = \rho \vec{v}$, where $\rho$ is the charge density and $\vec{v}$ is the velocity of the charge drift. Check your phenomenology. $\endgroup$
    – MsTais
    Aug 4 '17 at 14:14
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    $\begingroup$ @MsTais physics.stackexchange.com/questions/90995/… $\endgroup$ Aug 4 '17 at 14:15
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, ok, my bad... What I was referring to is current density. Thanks @CooperCape $\endgroup$
    – MsTais
    Aug 4 '17 at 14:52
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In spatial terms current is a scalar. It is the dot product of current density and orientated area.

In ac theory, current may be treated as a vector, because its magnitude and phase can be treated as a vector which rotates continuously in an abstract 'space', not in the real space that we inhabit. It is a mathematical device.

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