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Does the force impact a body to have momentum and kinetic energy, and how does it impacts? How does one differentiate the momentum of a body from the kinetic energy of the same body? Please give me an example that would picture the difference between the force, momentum and kinetic energy.

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Think of catching an apple.

  • Force is what stops the apple's motion. Your hand is applying that force. So force cause changes in both momentum and kinetic energy.
  • The apple has a weight. But when you catch it, it feels even heavier than it's weight. Momentum is what makes things feel heavier when you stop them from moving.
  • While momentum takes care of how hard the apple is to stop, the kinetic energy tells what happens after you stop it. This energy is converted into something else, for example heat. Kinetic energy is how much the apple can heat up (or do you work on) something else when impacting.
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Force by definition is something that brings about acceleration i.e. a change in velocity which has an effect on both Kinetic Energy and Momentum
To differentiate between Momentum and Kinetic Energy, imagine an ideal gun. On firing, both the gun and the bullet fired have the same momentum(conservation of momentum) but the bullet is far more dangerous than the gun because since it has the lower mass, it must have the higher velocity for the momentum to be the same and thus higher Kinetic Energy
Momentum has little meaning as a quantity but it is useful as it can give you an idea of the motion of a particle(it's a vector quantity) while Kinetic Energy can't(it's a scalar quantity)

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