-5
$\begingroup$

Can we use a computer fan with magnets attached to its blades, and another magnet, to generate electricity, as shown in this video?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiAhiu6UqXQ

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Please add additional information to the question outside of the video. Currently we cannot tell what you are asking about without opening another site, which many of us will not do. $\endgroup$ – JMac Aug 1 '17 at 14:11
  • $\begingroup$ Also, you should mention what you have already done to answer your question. $\endgroup$ – stafusa Aug 1 '17 at 14:14
  • $\begingroup$ actually i am not able to express my views the video is simple you can understand easily by just watching it $\endgroup$ – Rahul Meena Aug 1 '17 at 14:17
  • $\begingroup$ @RahulMeena Your question should provide a reasonable stand-alone reference to what you are asking. Because you are not explaining the question in your post, anyone else who tries to read this will have to also watch the video to understand the question. That is not what we want here. We want to be a question and answer resource site. It doesn't matter how "simple" the video is, it matters that the information is not on this site. Personally, I find Facebook to be extremely annoying when you don't have an account, so I avoid those links more than most links. $\endgroup$ – JMac Aug 1 '17 at 14:28
0
$\begingroup$

Now that the link is to a YouTube video, I will take a brief crack at it.

The video is an illusion. There is no "free lunch" when it comes to energy generation - that is well established. If your magnet pulls the small magnets on the fan blades towards it, it will do so in both directions - there would be no net rotation. So let's hypothesize what the creator of the video might have done to create this trick:

I believe that the fan was rigged with a simple battery and a Reed relay. A Reed relay is a magnetic switch that closes when you move a strong magnet close to it. This battery could then power the fan, and the power could be put on the wires so it can light the bulb.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.