1
$\begingroup$

As far as I know, the energy of muons can't be measured with the normal calorimeters that they measure the energy of other particles such as electrons, and it's due to its mass, it doesn't radiate, so it doesn't deaccelerate. So it takes kilometers for that to stop.

Now my question is that: Is there any direct way of measuring its energy, and what method do they use for this purpose in CERN and Fermilab and similar research institutes in their accelerators?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean 'calorimeter'? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jul 31 '17 at 19:07
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Muon detectors are basically big trackers. They measure momentum. $\endgroup$ – dukwon Jul 31 '17 at 20:20
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @dukwon Or they measure speed (if using a either a Cerenkov or transition radiation device). $\endgroup$ – dmckee Jul 31 '17 at 23:39
0
$\begingroup$

In the detectors of the LHC the muon momentum is measured in the tracking detectors by the curvature in the magnetic field. The particular muon detectors are necessary to identify that these tracks belong to weakly interacting particles, and use the return iron of the large magnets as part of the mass the track has to go through to make sure it is a weakly interacting one. For examples of events see this link.

The only weakly interacting long life particle in the standard model is the muon, and thus the muon mass is assigned to the track and the energy can be known. Now if you are thinking out of the standard model box it is a different story. It is our trust in the SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) symmetries. AFAIK there is no competitor to the muon in the dominant extensions of the standard model.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.