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Does gravity have anything to do with Van Der Waal's forces? Just throwing this out there, I was wondering if they do because gravity is such a weak force and the VdW forces at a molecular level could seem to be a good intermediary force between gravity and the forces acting within atoms. Given that there are so many atoms and molecules within objects like the earth doesn't it seem possible that an extrapolation of the VdW forces could make a good candidate for a theory of gravity?

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No. Van der Waals forces are electromagnetic, not gravitational. "Van der Waals forces" are actually a family of different effects. Dipole-dipole Van der Waals falls off as $1/r^7$ (non-retarded) or $1/r^8$ (retarded). These forces can be understood using only electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. Gravity is unnecessary in their explanation, and gravitational forces fall off as $1/r^2$.

Gravity accelerates all objects equally, whereas the magnitude of Van der Waals forces depends on the polarizability, which varies from material to material. They are not similar and neither can explain the other.

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An author called Zhang has indeed suggested they are related: https://arxiv.org/abs/1303.3579. As Zhang alludes to, "dark energy" is basically the new cosmological constant.

And I have seen other work by an author called Dmitriev - https://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0611173 - that suggests gravity is experimentally dependent on temperature - which Zhang relies on in theory.

I'm not endorsing these authors' work but I can't seem to find anything that criticises them.

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