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The Schwarzschild radius of a black hole is a classical barrier for light from inside of a black hole. But we know from electromagnetic waves and quantum mechanics that classical barriers can be crossed/tunneled, because on the other side of the barrier a so called https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evanescent_field exists. Does such a field also exist at the Schwarzschild surface? If yes couldn't we, e.g. by bringing another mass close (in the order of a few wavelength of the light) to the Schwarzschild surface, extract light out of the black hole again (analogous to Frustrated total internal reflection)?

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Theoretically it is actually possible. If you take the Schrodinger's equation and in the place of potential if you place the Newton's gravitational potential for the system you are talking about you can find out the tunneling constant. You will find out that the tunneling probability is inversely proportional to the exponential of the height and the length of the barrier.

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The event horizon of a black hole is not a classical barrier. It is the region beyond which all time-like and light-like paths lead to the singularity. As such, quantum tunneling won't allow electromagnetic radiation to escape.

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you think of the answer given here: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/171604/… ? $\endgroup$ – asmaier Jul 24 '17 at 20:56
  • $\begingroup$ After glancing through one of the papers, it looks like they treated the curved spacetime like a classical potential, then used relativised quantum mechanics to do the calculations. It's a phenomenological model of a specific phenomenon. That doesn't make it a true description of reality. $\endgroup$ – Johnathan Gross Jul 24 '17 at 21:30

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