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So I have a neodymium magnet. Its a bar. The issue I'm having is the the ends of the bar aren't where north/south are on the magnet, its on the front and back face of the magnet.

Is there a easy way I can move the north/south to the poles of the magnet, as would be expected from a bar magnet.

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably best to make clear here that when you speak of a "neodymium magnet" what you really mean is a neodymium compound magnet such as $Nd_2Fe_{14}B$. The pure element neodymium is also a ferromagnet, but only at very, very low temperatures below 19 Kelvin. $\endgroup$ – Samuel Weir Jul 17 '17 at 21:51
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No - you cannot change the direction of magnetization of neodymium magnets. This is explained in this article. Quoting from that article (my emphasis added)

[...] these powerful magnets are formed with a preferred magnetization direction. They are either pressed in the presence of a magnetic field, or undergo a second press (called die upsetting) that orients the magnetic domains in one direction. The magnets are actually magnetized later in the process, long after they are formed. Once a magnet is made, it can only be magnetized in that “preferred” direction.

You might think about it like a piece of wood, which has a grain running in one direction.

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You could cut the magnet in many smaller magnets and then stack them on top of each another. However, I'm not sure if you end up with a power, because I guess that neodymmagnets tend to fracture.

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My understanding is that you can change the poles of weak, lab-made magnets (such as those made of iron nickel alloy or steel) by demagnetizing and applying a strong magnetic field, but not neodymium magnets. For neodymium ones, even if methods exist, it would probably be easier to make new ones.

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  • $\begingroup$ You might want to add a source for your "understanding" - including why you think "it would probably be easier to make new ones". As it is, your answer is of the "take my word for it" kind, with nothing to back it up. I'm not saying you are not right - just that an answer is better when it has some evidence. $\endgroup$ – Floris Jul 17 '17 at 21:32

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