-3
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

Why can't we use F=(M+m)a to find the acceleration of the system?

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

As you see in the photo I have uploaded, I have drawn the Free Body Diagrams of the two blocks separately. I haven't shown the forces in the horizontal direction in the Free Body Diagrams but as you can see in the third diagram, I have considered both the blocks as one system while considering motion in the horizontal direction. So if the frictional force between the blocks is sufficient to resist the weight of the smaller block, it won't fall down and similarly, if the friction between the ground and the block is sufficient the system will be at rest. Otherwise, the equation would be

F-(frictional force)=(M+m)a

I hope this helps. :)

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

You need to include the friction force also. F is not the only force acting on the system.

Do a free body diagram first to solve problems like this.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ If i consider both the bodies as a system won't the frictional force be an internal force of the system which won't be taken in the fbd of the system? $\endgroup$ – A lotta doubts Jun 25 '17 at 10:02
  • $\begingroup$ No, the friction to the ground is external to the system $\endgroup$ – ja72 Jun 25 '17 at 10:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.