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Do we see the light from a star that has "died" and, let's say, it would reach Earth many years later, from past? Let's say the light from a star reached Earth, but that star has died long time ago. I am not sure about one thing: is the light only present? I understant that we perceive it later (for example the light that reaches from Moon to Earth, 1.2 seconds later), but that light is present. Can it be called "from past"?

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marked as duplicate by Emilio Pisanty, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, stafusa, Daniel Griscom Nov 2 '17 at 1:38

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Yes, we do indeed see astronomical bodies that might have died by now. We see them as they were in their past. (depending, obviously, on how far they are from us)

An example I can think of would be the Pillars of Creation which almost certainly were destroyed a thousand years ago by a shockwave from a nearby supernova. (This, of course, hasn't been seen yet because the structure is some 7000 light years away from the Earth)

This question will interest you:

Has everything we see happened in the past?

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