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Since transparent objects allow light to pass through, how can they be visible ?

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  • $\begingroup$ -1. This question seems to have been copied from Science ABC where it already has an answer (albeit a rather long-winded one). $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Jun 17 '17 at 20:35
  • $\begingroup$ @sammygerbil is there a policy against repetition of questions from other parts of the Internet? $\endgroup$ – Rococo Dec 9 '17 at 3:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Rococo No there is no such policy. But you are missing the point of my comment. The title has been copied from an article which contains an answer. So what is the point of asking the same question again here? The OP needs to explain why the Science ABC answer is not good enough. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Dec 9 '17 at 9:42
  • $\begingroup$ The site policy (as suggested by the voting button) is that those who post questions must make a Sufficient Research Effort to find an answer for themselves before asking here. Other users often spend considerable time writing an answer, and they do so in the expectation that the asker has not been able to find an answer easily elsewhere. Posting questions is not a game. $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Dec 9 '17 at 9:51
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I'd say for two main reasons:

  1. probably, a perfectly transparent object does not exist in nature;
  2. most importantly, transparent objects - as any other (finite) object - have boundaries, interfaces.
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  • $\begingroup$ What is the relation between , "having boundaries" and visibility of an object $\endgroup$ – user159326 Jun 17 '17 at 18:42
  • $\begingroup$ I'd say it's the essence of visibility of an object, especially a "transparent" one. Think, just for example, of refraction! $\endgroup$ – lucia de finetti Jun 17 '17 at 18:45
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    $\begingroup$ The boundary changes the index of refraction of light. $\endgroup$ – user154420 Jun 17 '17 at 18:45
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There’s two main reasons you can see the object and both are due to the boundary. Sometimes you see the effects of refraction but mostly you see the partial reflection. Both very interesting subjects.

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