0
$\begingroup$

We know there is a theoretical absolute zero (0K) at which particles have no kinetic energy, but is there an absolute hot at which a particle can be given no more kinetic energy?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Qmechanic Jun 12 '17 at 17:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4
$\begingroup$

The highest temperature limit now is currently thought to be the temperature at the Big Bang.Because the temperature greater than the big bang would mean to create something that was present in Planck era which we don't know much about.Plus,nothing observed in the universe till now is more hotter.

A good competitor would be the core of a supernova though. Also ,you can see http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/BBhistory.html

Laws of physics breakdown at that temperature above the Planck temperature of $10^{32}$ K so thus it's considered theoretically the highest temperature up to which we can measure.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.