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Does the nucleus of an atom affect spacetime curvature inside the atom? If so, how does this affect the electrons and other atoms?

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you asking if the nucleus affects the spacetime curvature around it i.e. whether it generates a gravitational field? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jun 9 '17 at 16:26
  • $\begingroup$ @JohnRennie yes , exactly . $\endgroup$ – user158657 Jun 9 '17 at 16:28
  • $\begingroup$ I've edited the question to clarify it in response to John's comment, and also to make the question body stand alone. @user158657, in the future we'd highly encourage you to make these sorts of edits yourself. $\endgroup$ – David Z Jun 9 '17 at 17:30
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It does bend the space around the electrons but the effect on the curvature of spacetime is so minuscule that it has almost no effect on the electron orbits. ( dictated by General Relativity)

At that level( state of the atom including mass of nucleus and the distance of electrons to nucleus ) the electromagnetic force is far stronger than gravitational force and hence its effect is almost negligible.

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  • $\begingroup$ I see . Is there a way it can effect uncharged particles with low mass ? $\endgroup$ – user158657 Jun 10 '17 at 3:12
  • $\begingroup$ It can, but still as gravity is such a weak force with many orders of magnitude smaller to cause significant effects so even with small masses( of the particles we know that exist)the effect will be insignificant. Only at large scales like that with a collection of very large numbers of atoms, it becomes significant. $\endgroup$ – Tausif Hossain Jun 10 '17 at 9:57

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