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How would you translate a constant force into work or energy? If I have a way to output 100KN continuously, how can I translate that into watts? Is there a formula for that translation?

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  • $\begingroup$ To do work, you must cause the body upon which you apply the force to move through a distance. In that case, the work done is the force times the distance moved. $\endgroup$ – Chet Miller Jun 5 '17 at 0:50
  • $\begingroup$ And, since watts is power, the amount of work that was done divided by the time that it took to do that work is the power that was applied. $\endgroup$ – David White Jun 5 '17 at 1:21
  • $\begingroup$ $E=W=F \cdot d$, $P=W/t$ $\endgroup$ – Brethlosze Jun 5 '17 at 4:15
  • $\begingroup$ Assuming your object moves at a constant velocity, then from P=FV and by knowing both F and V you can find the power output. $\endgroup$ – EigenFunction Jun 5 '17 at 7:03
  • $\begingroup$ And remember that all the products you see in the comments above are scalar products of vectors, so you must take either the directions in consideration. $\endgroup$ – Claudio P Jun 5 '17 at 11:44
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A force does work if there is atleast a component of the force in the direction of displacement of the block. The small work done $ dw $ by a constant force $ f $ in displacing the block through a small displacement $ ds $ is given by $ dw=fdscos\theta $, where $\theta$ is the angle between the force vector and the displacement vector. Since, power is work done per unit time,that is, $ p= \frac{dw}{dt} $ .

That is, $ p= fvcos\theta $, , where $\theta$ is the angle between the force vector and the velocity vector.

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