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If unpolarised light has electric fields in all planes, and for every electric field there is a magnetic field at 90 degrees, in every plane, there should be an electric field and magnetic field together? I might be wrong, but just explain it in basics. PS-I am doing my A levels

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if you take the unpolarised light traveling to a certain direction, your electric field can be seen as a plane perpendicular to that direction (something like this http://maths.edurite.com/userfiles/images/normal(1).bmp think of the n vector as the direction of the light and the blue plain would be the electric field) its kinda hard to define 90 degrees to that plain because that plain is like infinite vectors of electric field from the starting from the center of the plain but if you take every single one of those vectors there is always a magnetic field 90 degrees to that and if you take all those magnetic fields you get another plane of the magnetic fields .(this image might help too http://electron6.phys.utk.edu/light/images7-10/polari1.gif)

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For every electric field(which the unpolarized light contains) there is it's own magnetic field(relating to it's corresponding frequency and amplitude) in the plane perpendicular to it! And electric field and magnetic field can exist together in a plane but the pair which are related to each other with corresponding frequency and amplitude have to be in perpendicular planes!

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