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I understand that a BEC of atoms causes all the component atoms to have a single shared state. This affects the position/momentum of the atoms, and even excited states of the electrons.

But what about states of the atomic nucleus? Are they all shared as one uniform description, too? Processes involving different kinds of decays have different answers? In particular, what about excited nuclear isomers?

What happens if an atom in a condensate changes its nuclear excitement state?

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  • $\begingroup$ Doesn't a BEC require that all particles are indistinguishable? If true, then that atom leaves the condensate. $\endgroup$ – probably_someone May 29 '17 at 7:51
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In general there may be different excited states the nuclei can be in, In this case one would expect the condensate to have components in these differing states. There is a reason to expect (see below reference)that, even here, there would be a type of stimulated emission leading the condensates to tend to merge toward the same state (what I think you were asking about).

There is an interesting paper (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0375960196006421) about stimulated emission of massive particles using such a setup. Look into reference {1} contained therein. They have a discussion of the theoretical possibility of stimulating the transitions between nuclear states.

All of this would rely on the stimulating nuclei indeed being in a single state. Hope this helps!

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  • $\begingroup$ I’m really interested in suppressing such transitions. That is, would the probability of a transition be the product of all the atoms doing it at once? $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 29 '17 at 8:30
  • $\begingroup$ @JDlugosz I'd have to look into it, I'll try and get back to you in a couple days (busy busy) Look into the paper I cited and some others related (or referenced therein) in the meantime, you may find what you're looking for $\endgroup$ – R. Rankin May 29 '17 at 8:36

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