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Soap bubble artist here, trying to understand the science better. Surface tension helps to hold soap bubbles together. Great news for me. But, I think it is also the reason that if two soap bubbles get close enough together, they merge into one bubble. Now, I want to get my bubbles as close to each other as possible without merging into one bubble. Do I need to reduce the surface tension on my liquid and, if so, any ideas how can I manage to do this?

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Simply heat the solution or liquid which will increase its temperature and hence will reduce its surface tension further also reduces it viscousity .Actually the reason behind it is that when the tempertaure is increased, the kinetic energy of the molecules increases producing more random motion of the particles. So the open surface of the liquid experience less downward force due to randomness of the particles inside and hence it reduces the Surface Tension.Thats it, So easy and Simple.

Thanks

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  • $\begingroup$ You should consider to be a little bit more elaborate and explain the physics behind it. Like, how does increasing the temperature reduces its surface tension. $\endgroup$
    – Mitchell
    May 19, 2017 at 11:10
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    $\begingroup$ I hope that any one would not question it now. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    May 19, 2017 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I'll try that out and let you know how I get on. $\endgroup$ May 19, 2017 at 12:40
  • $\begingroup$ Yes Good............ $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    May 19, 2017 at 12:50
  • $\begingroup$ But can u tell me, why are u doing this ..typical thing. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    May 19, 2017 at 12:51
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It is not clear to me that lowering the surface tension of your soapy water will have the desired effect. As an alternative you could try to dissolve salt (regular table salt is fine) in it: salt is known to prevent coalescence of water bubbles, at least in a fluid bulk. I don't know if this is also the case for surface bubbles or for water saturated with surfactants, but there's only one way to find out!

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