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I have a circular container with a flange which sits inside a hole in a table which is mounted on vibration mounts and is vibrated by a linear vibrator. The container is a clearance fit in the hole, but is retained by two large O-rings which give a friction fit. When I apply the vibration I notice that the container is rotating anti-clockwise & rising out of the recess. Is this purely a function of the vibration and can it be applied in a way reverse this reaction?

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I mean the vibration clearly has something to do with this, but it is not clear what, exactly. For example, the vibration is presumably not the source of the energy gradient that pushes the container up and out; there is something further about the O-rings sliding upward that reduces the energy they're storing, such that random bumps "up" are more likely than random bumps "down". If you want you should be able to reverse that tendency by just putting something heavy in the container; it'd also be interesting to see if it falls by rotating clockwise. It could perhaps be caused by the hole being very slightly narrower at the bottom than at the lip, or by dust etc. falling in so that this is effectively true: then the O-rings would slowly push the thing upwards. If you could determine that as the cause then the solution would be to find a way to bore out the insides a little more than the lip, so that the O-rings want to draw the thing down rather than up.

The clockwise/counterclockwise directionality is also rather odd. There could be surface imperfections from whenever the hole was drilled which cause the O-rings to want to twist one way (test by finely sanding?), or there could be something about the O-rings themselves (if they both look the same, then you might try all eight configurations: A and B oriented the way they are right now, A same but B flipped upside-down, A upside-down but B same, both upside-down, then all of those configurations with B and A interchanged).

There is only one extrinsic thing on Earth that causes things to happen with a particular handedness and it is very unlikely to apply here: there exists a very weak force called the Coriolis effect, which makes anything that rises upward drift slightly to the West, and when something falls then it drifts slightly east. In addition motion towards the nearest pole (as in North or South) acts like "falling" and motion towards the equator acts like "rising" for these purposes, because it's distance-from-the-rotation-axis, not distance-from-the-center, which matters here. So that could hypothetically cause such an asymmetry, but the effect is very weak because the Earth turns so slowly: the $F/m$ of the force is the characteristic speed $s$ that the thing vibrates at, multiplied by $2\pi/\text{day}.$ So if the linear vibrator moves back and forth by 1 mm, then even if it vibrates at a frequency of 100 kHz you would only see accelerations in the $0.001\text{ g}$ range, at most.

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