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An object in spacetime warps it and creates like a pit. If the object had such a huge mass and gravity that the pit edges were touching or were anyway very close would it be possible to skip a portion of spacetime?... it would be sort of like a shortcut through spacetime.

Have I just described a black hole? Sorry if it's a silly question but I have been wondering this all day.

I guess the gravity would cause an object trying to do what I described to just fall into the pit

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  • $\begingroup$ Is something wrong with using wormholes for this purpose? On some interpretations a black hole is a wormhole between otherwise disjoint universes, but if you wish to "skip" a part of this spacetime wormholes are the way to go (assuming they are anything more than a theoretical toy). $\endgroup$
    – Conifold
    May 12, 2017 at 21:47

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Well, you have two options, and both are speculative.

The first one is an Alcubierre drive. See wiki at https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcubierre_drive It's something that creates strong gravity in front of your space machine so that space is compressed and you travel through it quickly, and then letting it get back to normal behind you. There is a general relativity solution by Alcubierre that people have interpreted this way. But it requires something supermassive in fron of you to create it, and I think even then it may need some exotic matter - I forget exactly but there are reasons why it's more speculative than not. You can see the link.

Another one is to somehow form or find a wormhole, you can Google it. This is a black hole on one side and white hole on the other. Also not easy, and the white hole part is still speculative. Also, the wormhole closes too fast for you to transverse it unless you have exotic matter in it to hold it open. Exotic matter is negative mass matter. Nothing we theoretically even know what it could be.

So, Lara, however you were able to get around the galaxy before, stick with that.

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What you are talking about is called Wormhole

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