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In a three jet event, a high transverse momentum gluon is emitted before the hadronisation of quarks takes place. What is the intermediate process that the gluon undergoes before it hadronises?

I am imagining that it will produce a $q \bar q$ pair, but if that is the case, why do we see three distinct jets and not four?

Is it due to a small opening angle between the quarks?

Three Jet events

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All hadronizations go through the production of quark anti-quark pairs. A two jet event in e+e- is an event with two quarks where the radiated gluons have taken a small part of the energy of the quark and usually they are as many as the number of pion etc generated after the two body decay hadronizes.

Three jet events means that the gluon has a large ptransverse and that is the way the events are picked up from the general mess,leading to jets with large angles between them. Hadronization balances momentum and energy keeping the direction of the original partons in the basic interaction.

hadronization

The hadronization happens so that color neutral hadrons can appear, and it is the "leading particle effect" ( just an indicative link) for these secondary diagrams, the crossection falls rapidly for secondary lines leaving the main gluon line at large angles.

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