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As a gravitational wave passes by a region, do the space-time dimensions undulate and move in a wavelike fashion? Does LIGO measure the movement of the space-time dimensions as a gravitational wave passes on by?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi, this article is useful: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_wave If you read through it, then you could ask questions on the aspects of gravitational waves that you may not follow. The same idea with LIGO. You are expected to do some background reading, if you have then you could include that in your questions. $\endgroup$ – user154420 May 2 '17 at 20:46
  • $\begingroup$ Hello @Countto10. Thank you. Please answer: As a gravitational wave passes by a region, do the space-time dimensions undulate and move in a wavelike fashion? Thanks! $\endgroup$ – girlphysicsmajor May 2 '17 at 21:11
  • $\begingroup$ Pairs of gargantuan black holes, more than a million times as massive as the sun and larger than the ones Advanced LIGO detected, radiate long, undulating waves. Though Advanced LIGO can’t detect waves at this frequency, scientists might spot them by looking for subtle variations in the steady beats of pulsars. But the waves produced are not the same form as electromagnetic waves. There is stretching and distortion as detailed on the Wikipedia page. stuver.blogspot.ie/2012/06/… $\endgroup$ – user154420 May 2 '17 at 21:30
  • $\begingroup$ Hello @Countto10. Thank you. Please answer: As a gravitational wave passes by a region, do the space-time dimensions undulate and move in a wavelike fashion? Thanks! $\endgroup$ – girlphysicsmajor May 2 '17 at 21:31
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As a gravitational wave passes by a region, do the space-time dimensions undulate and move in a wavelike fashion?

Define wavelike as : solutions of wave equations, might be sinusoidal or not depending on boundary conditions.

Does LIGO measure the movement of the space-time dimensions as a gravitational wave passes on by?

Watch this video

The changes in the measured positions in the detectors of LIGO as the gravitational wave passed are in acoustical frequencies and are transcribed so as to be audible sounds.

It is similar to the change in distance between sea buoys when a sea wave passes, one can measure the wave against the absolute coordinates defined by the bottom. The coordinates are the positions of the LIGO detectors, ensured against transfers of ground vibrations, and the distances between the detectors are changing with a sinusoidal signal.

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