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I understand that the particles come and go of existence in the empty space. So, what effect could a stable particle (one that do not go out of existence in space) like an atom, or its nucleus alone, have on the formation and disappearance of those particles? Would the mass, charge or the mere presence of the atom, or its nucleus, induce some effect? If so, please explain it to a non-physicist.

Thank you, Ravi

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The popularization of virtual particle-antiparticle pairs that briefly appear and disappear in a vacuum does require the existence of fields, so yes the existence of nearby stable particles is required.

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  • $\begingroup$ Wonderful, Thank you Mr. Miller. Does this mean that, in the absence of a stable particle like atom, these virtual particles do not appear in space? $\endgroup$ – Ravikumar Rajappa Apr 12 '17 at 4:36
  • $\begingroup$ Tha is more of a philosophical than a physics question. Without a field there is no way of observing them. Quantum physics is agnostic on the reality of unobserved entities. $\endgroup$ – Lewis Miller Apr 13 '17 at 14:15
  • $\begingroup$ I get it. Thank you Dr. Miller. Very kind of you to answer. $\endgroup$ – Ravikumar Rajappa Apr 14 '17 at 4:31

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