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I read Introduction to special relativity by Robert Resnick. It is a beautiful book as an introduction. I got insights and intuition in special relativity. I want to learn special relativity at a more deeper level. Please recommend some books/ research papers for special relativity?

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"The Meaning of Relativity" - A.Einstein. This will help you make the connection between SR and GR - tensor notations, etc - since deeper then special relativity is general relativity, but I suppose you wanted to say "more general appliance", "arbitrary directions", etc.

Feynman lecture - volume 2 - Feynman Lectures (there is also volume 1 [and 3] - as good as 2nd)

Relativity - MIT Course 8.033 (very good course, treating more advanced topics too and cosmology/BigBang stuff)

Special Relativity - Video Lectures - L. Susskind (and if you want more you could always get to see his GR lectures; if that won't be enough you can get to see his String/M-theory lectures; if that won't be enough you can get his ER=EPR lectures)

Classical Electrodynamics - Robert G. Brown (Duke University Physics Department) - I found this useful on several occasions (ex: when dealing with electromagnetic tensor transformations)

Also when dealing with arbitrary directions this derivation is quite nice.

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  • $\begingroup$ Already read Feynman lectures all volumes (best for starting any field). Thank you for video lectures but I am really interested in reading research papers. $\endgroup$ – Nukul Parmar Apr 11 '17 at 18:20
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"Special Relativity: An Introduction with 200 Problems and Solutions" by Michael Tsamparlis covers a lot of stuff and goes in depth.

It can also be used as a "SR cookbook", because if you need some SR formula, you will probably find it there. If not, then you probably won't find it easily in some other SR textbook.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is my favorite book on SR. It's EXTREMELY thorough. $\endgroup$ – Ken Wang Aug 16 '19 at 6:13
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There is an old book by Max Born, called Einstein's Theory of Relativity which explains the Special Relativity in great detail without any advanced mathematics and a little bit of General Relativity.

It is suitable for those who has not yet started to physics degree or will not, but would like to understand the theory in a deeper and mathematical manner. Then one can go for a more advanced textbooks by learning real calculus and vector algebra/calculus and so forth.

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My favourite books on special relativity, both advanced and with a strong geometric flavour, are:

É. Gourgoulhon, Special Relativity in General Frames: From Particles to Astrophysics, Springer, 2013.

G. L. Naber, The geometry of Minkowski spacetime, Springer, 2010.

They both require a non-basic knowledge of linear algebra.

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    $\begingroup$ Please write substantial answers that detail the style, content, and prerequisites of the book, paper or other resource. Explain the nature of the resource so that readers can decide which one is best suited for them rather than relying on the opinions of others. Answers containing only a reference to a book or paper will be removed! $\endgroup$ – AccidentalFourierTransform Aug 17 '17 at 14:54
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    $\begingroup$ @AccidentalFourierTransform I hardly see any difference in the level of details of this answer and those of the only one you didn't propose for removal. Anyway when I'll be back from vacation I'll expand this answer if it's still here. $\endgroup$ – Massimo Ortolano Aug 17 '17 at 15:11
  • $\begingroup$ I support Massimo here. $\endgroup$ – timur Oct 18 '19 at 14:13
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The best book on special relativity that I have read is by A. P. French and has the title "Special Relativity (M.I.T. Introductory Physics)". Everything is very carefully and clearly derived and a lot of advanced topics are also included.

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