1
$\begingroup$

Imagine the visual light-frequencies version of an anechoic chamber (Vantablack walls, anyone?). If one were to shine a flashlight inside this sealed chamber, what would he/she see?

I can imagine shining the light right in your eyes would be visible, but if you shone the light on your forearm, would you be able to see it? Yes, you would, but might someone please qualify this assertion if needed?

If you shone a plain exposed light bulb, would you be able to see visually perceive in any fashion the floor/walls/ceiling? (Again, assume that this room's interior surfaces absorb light to a similar degree that the anechoic chamber absorbs sound.)

Consider a (reflecting/opaque) object placed nearly (but not exactly) at opposition to this light bulb (from the reference of the viewer--think Solar System astronomy here). Would there be substantial glare from the light bulb such that the remote object could not be seen?

I've already read this related question. And this one, also.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ If the source of light was behind you and the walls are perfect absorbers, you wouldn't see anything. It would be pitch black. $\endgroup$ – Yashas Apr 9 '17 at 13:16
0
$\begingroup$

As of perceiving the walls, everything depends on how good you absorbing chamber is. Some materials have extraordinary absorption abilities (like Vantablack) but it is difficult to make and expensive.

For seeing the object behind the light bulb, you will probably be blinded by the bulb if it is strong enough (again it depends), but it may certainly be possible to use a mask – like a coronograph. This will also depend on how clean is the air since dust tends to scatter light.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

If you removed any impurities in the air, eg dust, you couldn't tell if your flashlight was on or off. The light has to be reflected towards your eyes to be detected. We don't actually see light (photons), we see light (brightness) when our brains create images. Our brains only create images when photons strike our retina, or when we dream. If you place an object which reflects all the photons away from you, you will not see anything. If some of the photons pass through the object an strike your retina you will see the object.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.