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I am doing a spectroscopy demo and I am trying to identify the phosphors used in CFLs (and their spectra). Does anyone have a reputable source for these. The Wikipedia, Sylvania and the DOE websites lack much specific information.

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I found the abstract of a promising (if slightly dated) paper: Srivastava, A. M. and Soules, T. F. 2000. Phosphors. Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology. (I searched on the name of the first author, A. Srivastava, because I know he has been working on phosphors for CFLs and other lighting technology pretty much his entire life). While I don't have access to the full paper, the abstract was promising:

Luminescent Materials (Phosphors). Commercial phosphors are typically inorganic powders which convert some form of invisible exciting energy into visible light. For this reason and because they can be quite efficient energy converters, they are commonly used in lamps, television screens, display terminals, x-ray machines, and a variety of other applications. All of these types of phosphors are discussed in some detail. What phosphors consist of, how they work, how they are made, and some of the technological aspects of their production and use in each application are described. There are a wide variety of materials which luminesce under some form of excitation including common minerals and many organic dyes. However probably less than a hundred of these materials are efficient enough and maintain their efficiency well enough in the environment of their application to have any technological significance. All of these materials are inorganic compounds although there are many more organic compounds which fluoresce. The article is intended to be comprehensive but does not include specialized knowledge about certain phosphor materials or information on new or experimental phosphors or phosphor applications which are not widespread, eg, infrared-to-visible converting phosphors which although very interesting are used only in certain laser applications.

Link to the article (behind a paywall)

Another promising source of information is the US patent office. There are an enormous number of patents in this field - for example you can search "GE fluorescent light patents phosphor" and find a lot of them (e.g. US6867536. To actually find out what phosphor is used on a particular bulb, find the package - it will usually list "somewhere" all the patents that apply to that product. Search for those patents, and you will get the detailed chemistry of the phosphors used.

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You might compare your own analysis with this analysis in wikipedia, which is not reputable but readily accessible. It identifies 22 peaks in the spectrum of a fluorescent lamp. The references given are now dead links, except one by Srivastava.

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