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As we know that all particle acquire massed by interacting with the higgs field so why the leptons, quarks and bosons acquire mass by difference method?

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    $\begingroup$ please comment what are those methods? $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 29 '17 at 20:30
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Leptons and quarks make up matter. Bosons, or more precisely their exchange, are responsible for the fundamental forces. (There are more bosons around, but I understand that your question is about the difference between matter and force carriers in how they acquire mass.)

Now, leptons and quarks acquire mass through their interaction with the Higgs field via a mechanism known as "Yukawa". It corresponds to the popularized metaphors of someone moving through a liquid and feeling heavier, or a celebrity moving through a crowded room and acquiring followers, making it harder to move.

As to bosons, actually only the W and Z bosons (the carriers of the weak force) are relevant here, because photons and gluons are massless. W and Z acquired their mass during the "electroweak symmetry breaking", through what is known as "Higgs mechanism". Note that "electroweak" refers to the unified electromagnetic and weak forces, but as the universe cooled down they got separated. During this, in a rather elaborate sequence of events, some components of the Higgs field were lost in order for W and Z to arise with masses.

This is a rather sketchy answer to your question, but your question goes deep :) The bottom line is that matter particles interact with the Higgs field through the Yukawa interactions, and W and Z acquired their masses through the Higgs mechanism during the electroweak breaking.

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To the OP: Unfortunately I'm a new member so I can't add comments yet. So please allow me to write here in order to reply to a comment of yours.

You wrote "as we know that the Higgs (H) is a supersymmetric particle which is still not discovered then why we wrote the H in the standard model of particle table. I think it should be small h (this discovered one). any comment will be appreciated". This is 100% wrong (sorry!).

The Higgs boson is a particle predicted within the "standard model" and it was discovered a few years ago. Both H and h can be used, H is more common. Later the theory of supersymmetry predicted a multiplet of additional "higgses" and "higgsinos". These are of course not discovered yet.

PS: By this comment of yours I feel that my previous answer was at some level above what was suitable here.

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In layman's terms, not ALL 'particles' acquire mass through the Higgs field only the ones that interact with the higgs field acquire some mass. The gluon, photon, and the neutrinos do not interact with the higgs field. Most of the mass from the more massive particles comes from the binding energy that holds them together. For example the binding energy for quarks inside of a hadron is the strong interaction which is mediated by gluons.

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  • $\begingroup$ according to your statement that most of the mass is coming from the binding energy then why the Higgs is such a big deal? $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 30 '17 at 12:29
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    $\begingroup$ Because it completes the standard model (so to speak) it was predicted as a necessary component. Scientists could see experimentally that electrons(and other charged leptons) along with the W&Z bosons and quarks contained a small amount of mass individually. This mass could not be explained without a Higgs field. It was predicted and found. It was sort of the last puzzle piece for this section of the puzzle. This is not , of course, where most of YOUR mass comes from though or any other element of matter. $\endgroup$ – Brad S Mar 30 '17 at 12:48
  • $\begingroup$ as we know that the Higgs (H) is a supersymmetric particle which is still not discovered then why we wrote the H in the standard model of particle table. I think it should be small h (this discovered one). any comment will be appreciated. $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 31 '17 at 3:36
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, the naming conventions are confusing at best. I think they gave the massive(non-zero) Higgs an upper-case letter because it is named after one of the people that predicted it. But I can't really speak intelligently about that. Sorry. $\endgroup$ – Brad S Mar 31 '17 at 21:35
  • $\begingroup$ as we know that the atom will disintegrate if the higgs field becomes zero so it means that the higgs field depends on the binding energy of atoms? $\endgroup$ – Higgs Apr 1 '17 at 12:36

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