5
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

We learned at school that white object reflects all the light that falls on it. We also learned that a mirror reflects all light as well. However, we cannot see ourselves in a white object while we can see ourselves in a mirror.

What makes a mirror different from a white surface?

If both white surface and mirror reflect all the light that fall on them, then why don't they look the same?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Yashas, Kyle Kanos, Jon Custer, sammy gerbil Apr 11 '17 at 21:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    $\begingroup$ Imagine a mirror, then break it into two pieces oriented in different directions. The image will be split in two. Repeat this process until you no longer notice a difference. The object is now white. $\endgroup$ – user126422 Mar 26 '17 at 1:23
  • 6
    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of What is the difference between a white object and a mirror? $\endgroup$ – Apoorv Potnis Mar 26 '17 at 4:45
1
$\begingroup$

MIRROR

  • The thing is that, A mirror is a surface from which light get totally reflected.

  • It have a polished surface. We generally see mirror effect from metal surface.

  • The light which come in strike at angle $\theta$ to the normal and reflect away at $\theta$ from the normal.

WHITE SURFACE

  • It is a surface which seems to be white but it reflect and disperse of all seven visible wavelength.

  • The surface is microscopically very rough. White surface are generally clothes, paints, non-metal, paper.

  • The light which come in strike at angle $\theta$ to the normal and reflect away at many various angle from the normal.

  • There is lot of distortion and dispersion of light.

That is why, a mirror $surface$ and white $surface$ are different.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think dispersion of light means what you think it means. $\endgroup$ – M. Enns Mar 26 '17 at 4:19
0
$\begingroup$

A white object only appears white if white light is striking it. If only red light is striking it, it appears red. A mirror has less distortion than other surfaces so it reflects light in a straight line. You don't see the surface of the mirror but rather the objects from which the light originates.

NB, when I speak about white or red light, it's important to remember that light itself has no colour. Colours are merely how our brains interpret different wavelengths.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.