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I know about Faraday's Law and how it states that an electric field will be produced if it will sense a change in magnetic flux that there are other sources of electric field except for an electric charge like a changing magnetic flux, magnetic field and area.

I'm just curious if changing or varying the current of a conductor will produce an electric field on another conductor.

Take for example two solenoids. If the other solenoid has a current but varies, so in effect its magnetic field will also vary since the magnetic field depends on current and an electric field would then be produced in the other solenoid but in opposing current relative to the magnetic field produced by the first solenoid.Just wanted to be sure that one of the reason of electric field produced is the varying or changing current in the first solenoid.

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    $\begingroup$ If I've read your question correctly, this is exactly how a transformer works. (With the additional twist that the ratio of the number of wraps in the two solenoids results in a ratio in their voltages as well.) Check out how a transformer works and if that doesn't answer your question, try clarifying it. $\endgroup$ – Paul B Mar 23 '17 at 22:04
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Well yes, you've exactly just showed how a transformer works. Basically it is a device made of two coils, a primary winding and a secondary winding. Alternating current runs through the primary winding, inducing a changing magnetic field in the core. Since both primary and secondary coils share the same core, a voltage is induced in the secondary coil. The ratio of the number of turns in the two windings is directly proportional to the ratio of voltages across the two coils.

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