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If the temperature is below 273.16K(triple point), the water vapor will first condensate to solid and then melt to liquid when increasing the pressure. Can we use symmetry breaking theory(or a fundamental theory) to explain this phenomena?

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Can we use symmetry breaking theory(or a fundamental theory) to explain this phenomena?

It is strange to use advanced theories for such a basic phenomenon. Water has an electric dipole behavior and lowering the temperature one lowers the kinetic energy of the water molecules and by this allows the molecules to bond to each over in a crystalline structure.

In physics, symmetry breaking is a phenomenon in which (infinitesimally) small fluctuations acting on a system crossing a critical point decide the system's fat.. Wikipedia about Symmetry breaking

This implies that there are two possible results behind the critical point and this isn't the case when ...

... water vapor will first condensate to solid and then melt to liquid when increasing the pressure.

So there isn't any need in Symmetry breaking theory for water behavior near 0°C.

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