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It is known that uranium glass shows strong green fluorescence under near UV illumination which could promise green lasers without non-linear crystals.

Is it feasible to build Uranium doped laser (ether glass or crystal based)? Were there any attempts on that in the past?

Uranium radioactivity is not part of the question here, depleted uranium has acceptable radioactivity for professional use.

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    $\begingroup$ Why do you think that uranium would not be acting nonlinearly if you used it as a laser gain medium? $\endgroup$ – The Photon Mar 13 '17 at 2:58
  • $\begingroup$ @ThePhoton Surely nonlinear effects will happen, they these will be parasitic and we will not care about them as long as laser itself still works. No need to do some +-0.2°C temperature stabilization to keep optimal SHG efficiency. $\endgroup$ – BarsMonster Mar 13 '17 at 17:53
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    $\begingroup$ As a colleague once remarked, if you pump anything hard enough you can get it to lase. There are plenty of green lasers, so I'm not quite sure why you want to go down that road, but... $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Mar 14 '17 at 23:30
  • $\begingroup$ @JonCuster As far as I see it there are not that many solid state lasers in green without frequency conversion. There is Pr:YLF one, but green line has lower gain. Can't think of any other ones hence my interest to potential uranium-doped medium use if there are useful lines. $\endgroup$ – BarsMonster Mar 15 '17 at 1:09
  • $\begingroup$ Laser diodes don't count? And you didn't specify solid state, so various gas lasers could count. And doubled YAG really isn't that hard to do. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Mar 15 '17 at 1:19
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Actually, Uranium-doped crystals were historically one of the first solid state lasers. But not in green wavelengths.

Wikipedia Solid-State lasers

Uranium-doped calcium fluoride was the second type of solid state laser invented, in the 1960s. Peter Sorokin and Mirek Stevenson at IBM's laboratories in Yorktown Heights (US) achieved lasing at 2.5 µm shortly after Maiman's ruby laser.

Searching around, there were a fair number of papers mentioning lasing in the microns (here's discussing the energy levels involved). This was by no means an exhaustive search, but while there were papers discussing fluorescence, I did not come across any discussing lasing in the green region.

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  • $\begingroup$ That is definitely surprising revelation :-) I assume in the 70's there were no bright UV sources for that... $\endgroup$ – BarsMonster Mar 16 '17 at 14:28

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