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can the higgs particle interact with himself as it is the antiparticle of himself?

as we know that the every particle is the excitation of their respective fields i.e higgs of higgs field so what about the antiparticle?

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marked as duplicate by sammy gerbil, user259412, Yashas, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos Mar 12 '17 at 12:15

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    $\begingroup$ The Higgs boson does interact with itself; however, this has nothing to do with it being its own antiparticle. (To clarify, the physical Higgs boson is indeed its own antiparticle.) $\endgroup$ – jjc385 Mar 11 '17 at 22:03
  • $\begingroup$ Feynman diagrams for Higgs self-interaction can for example be found here (in e.g. equation 97). $\endgroup$ – diracula Mar 11 '17 at 22:06
  • $\begingroup$ Trying to understand where your question is coming from, you might be thinking about how a charged particle can annihilate its antiparticle. In the case of electric charge, this annihilation will produce a photon. But there are also other types of forces/ charges -- the weak force and the strong force. In particular, the Higgs is 'charged' under the weak force, and because of this, the Higgs can annihilate its antiparticle (i.e., itself) and produce a Z boson. $\endgroup$ – jjc385 Mar 11 '17 at 22:09
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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of How does the Higgs Boson gain mass itself? $\endgroup$ – sammy gerbil Mar 11 '17 at 22:11
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Its antiparticle is itself, like photon is anti-photon.

Antiparticle isn't a de-excitation of a field (well... maybe a little in the Dirac sea interpretation, but it's a not a good interpretation at all...).

Yes, the Higgs boson self-interacts with itself. It can interact splitting a boson into two (or merging two into one), splitting in three (or colliding with other, or merging three into one), and the combinations that arise from that (because quantum fields "do what they want", "have free will", "are like fairies but with well defined tastes").

For really understanding this, read peskin-schroeder "an introduction to Quantum Field Theory".

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  • $\begingroup$ could you please complete the answers of both the questions. $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 11 '17 at 22:07
  • $\begingroup$ What is the second question? $\endgroup$ – wiskundeliefhebber Mar 11 '17 at 22:12
  • $\begingroup$ as we know that the every particle is the excitation of their respective fields i.e higgs of higgs field so what about the antiparticle, are they are the de-excitation of the the fields? $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 11 '17 at 22:16
  • $\begingroup$ Antiparticle isn't a de-excitation of a field (well... maybe a little in the Dirac sea interpretation, but it's a not a good interpretation at all...). Yes, the Higgs boson self-interacts with itself. It can interact spliting a boson into two (or merging two into one), spliting in three (or colliding with other, or merging three into one), and the combinations that arise from that (because quantum fields "do what they want", "have free will", "are like fairies but with well defined tastes"). For really understanding this, read peskin-schroeder "an introduction to Quantum Field Theory". $\endgroup$ – Uli_WH Mar 11 '17 at 23:10
  • $\begingroup$ What is the difference between the Haevy(H) and light higgs(h) and which one of them had been discovered in the in 2012 at CERN. $\endgroup$ – Higgs Mar 12 '17 at 7:00

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