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Water is continously evaporating at room temperature.. But how to intentionally increase the rate of evaporation at same temperature

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  • $\begingroup$ What's your actual goal? For example, if your goal is to increase the water content of the air, then the answer "dehumidify the air to increase the net evaporation" is a non-starter. $\endgroup$ Mar 10 '17 at 22:04
  • $\begingroup$ My aim is to find or know if there is an agent which wen added to water can make it evaporate at faster rate. Let's take it as, the water is in a bowl tat can hold only a mouth full of water $\endgroup$ Mar 11 '17 at 8:49
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    $\begingroup$ -1 Your question shows that you diden't search $\endgroup$
    – veronika
    Mar 11 '17 at 10:39
  • $\begingroup$ @veronika it shows that I'm eager to know my answer for my question $\endgroup$ Mar 13 '17 at 6:21
  • $\begingroup$ -1 You must search more. $\endgroup$
    – user143115
    Mar 22 '17 at 7:38
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  • Increase the surface area by placing the water in a shallow tray.
  • Blow (preferably warm) air over it by creating a cross-draught or using a fan. (Warmer air holds more moisture.)
  • Place the water in a metal container with a good thermal contact with its surroundings, so that it does not cool down as it evaporates.
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    $\begingroup$ And the not-so-practical choice -- lower the pressure in the room. $\endgroup$
    – tpg2114
    Mar 10 '17 at 17:15
  • $\begingroup$ @tpg2114 That's not necessarily impractical depending on what they are doing. It could be as easy as opening a door or window(depending on the outside pressure and why you are doing this in the first place). $\endgroup$
    – JMac
    Mar 10 '17 at 17:23
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    $\begingroup$ Blowing air over it also increases the rate of convective mass transfer by increasing the water vapor concentration gradient in the air near the surface. $\endgroup$ Mar 10 '17 at 20:10
  • $\begingroup$ atlasobscura.com/places/salt-ponds-san-francisco $\endgroup$ Mar 10 '17 at 23:22
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    $\begingroup$ In addition to these ideas, I suggest dampening a cloth in the water, and hanging it so one end remains underwater. That adds the area of the cloth to the surface area for evaporation. $\endgroup$ Mar 10 '17 at 23:34
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In addition to the points mentioned by sammy gerbil, you can also lower the surrounding air/vapor pressure so that the water starts to boil at room temperature.

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In addition to the other good answers...

Agitate the water so that it's surface area increases. For example, stir the water or blow air (bubbles) through the water.

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An ultrasonic humidifier vastly increases the surface area available for evaporation by breaking up the water into millions of very small droplets.

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One way is to add a large wick. This will draw water up and increase the surface aria exposed to the air.

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it mostly depends on what your goal is but increasing the surface area in any way, such as using a cloth to soak up the water, putting it into a large shallow tray, or if you are trying to dry out an item, you can spread it out flat. (upside down also helps sometimes). if you put it into an empty shot needle then stretch it out, it can cause it to boil at room temp. which will let it evaporate faster.

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    $\begingroup$ You're only causing it to evaporate, not boil. This also seems to be pretty much the same as all the other answers here. $\endgroup$
    – JMac
    Apr 29 '18 at 15:12

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