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An object in free fall is defined as one that is moving solely under the influence of gravity.

  1. So if an object has reached terminal velocity(force of gravity is cancelled out by upwards force of drag), does that mean that the object is no longer free falling?
  2. If this is true doesn't that mean that no object is truly free falling since they are all also influenced by air resistance?
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If there is drag force (or any other force apart from gravity) the motion is no longer a free fall.

An object falling on vacuum is in free fall. You might wonder whether a perfect vacuum is possible or not but for a good vacuum the drag is totally negligible. Indeed, free fall in vacuum chamber constitutes precise tests of the Equivalence Principle

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