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Glue seems to hold together almost all solid things. But on the atomic level, if two things have the same charge they tend to repel.

So is it possible to charge glue and a solid with a charge?

And if possible, will they then repel as they are of same charge?

I'm no physics grad so I'm sorry if the question is trivial.

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Glue seems to hold together almost all solid things. But in an atomic level, if two things have the same charge they tend to repel.

In general atoms are neutral, there is as much positive charge in the nucleus as negative in the number of electrons around it.

If the electrons were a uniform cloud around the positive charge, chemistry as we know it would not exist because all atoms would repulse all other atoms and no close contact would be established. Fortunately the system is quantum mechanical and there are attractions. This happens because atoms and molecules do not have their electrons in orbits around the nucleus, but in orbitals ( probability loci) which usually do not cover the space around the nucleus completely.

orbitals

Suitably aligned f atomic orbitals overlap to form phi molecular orbital (a phi bond)

The variations in space allow the positive electric fields of the nucleus to appear in the intervals, and thus there are attractive forces between atoms and molecules which bind into solid structures. ( think of LEGO blocks as an image, or a three dimensional jig saw puzzle). These are the spill over forces that exist in completely neutral solids.

So a material that is a glue has to have molecular orbitals such that would lock into the positions of most materials, binding them into one lattice.

So is it possible to charge glue and any solid thing to a particular charge?

From the above description you will see that the answer is that the question is irrelevant. Charging matter is not the same as matter existing in solid lattices. Same charge bodies will repel, but it has nothing to do with how glue works.

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