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Was just curious, since all compasses point to the North Pole. South is just the opposite polarity of of North, so it seems very likely, but I've never seen an example of this. Is there any videos demonstrating this?

Could a South attractor be added to a standard compass to help confirm the integrity of the North's signal? (For situations where the compass is being affected by another magnetic source).

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  • $\begingroup$ They all are attracted to the South Pole. And the North. Actually, they are attracted to the magnetic north and south poles. Where I live the deviation between magnetic north and true north is about 10 degrees. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Feb 15 '17 at 21:19
  • $\begingroup$ It is a mistake to say that the needle of a compass is attracted to the Earth's north pole. What a compass needle really does is, it aligns itself with the ambient magnetic field. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field#Magnetic_field_lines $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow Aug 12 '17 at 22:35
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    $\begingroup$ What if you repaint the needle with opposite colors? :-) $\endgroup$ – peterh Aug 12 '17 at 23:06
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If possible do as @AccidentalFourierTransform explained in a comment, namely:

Get a standard compass. Clean off the paint in one end of the needle, and pain the other one. Congrats, now you have a compass that is attracted to the South Pole!

Be aware, that some compasses are embedded in an oil capsule, so disassembling will destroy them mostly.

Also remember that the needle uses always both poles, as the magnetic field influences the structure of the needle as a whole. Otherwise it wouldnt't work, so the easiest is to use your imagination.

Perhaps you meant the declination which must be adjusted on the compass, which can influence the way you've got to take, when hiking close to the north or south? Navigation 101

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Another approach is to remagnetize the needle in the opposite direction using a strong magnetic field. Then the painted end will point south.

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    $\begingroup$ Why does repainting the needle get a positive vote and remagnetizing it a negative one? They both work and have the same result. $\endgroup$ – A. Newell Aug 12 '17 at 23:06

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