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Can gauss law be used for induced electric field due to time-varying magnetic field?
This field is non conservative hence, I thought it may behave differently. Also if it is permissible yo use it, would the surface integral always be 0 as no net charge present?

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  • $\begingroup$ It was kind of inspired from that question, but I couldn't understand the answers! $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 7:05

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Yes, you can easily use gauss's law in this situation. This is one of the great things about gauss's law as it is a fundamental law and can be used in any situation, regardless of whether the field is non-conservative, the charges are moving and so on(Unlike coloumb's law which demands stationary charges for its usage).

In fact, you need to use gauss's law in case of time varying electric fields to get the correct nature of the induced electric field. Since there is no enclosed charge, there is no flux coming out and if you take a uniform surface to enclose the specific area , the electric field can never have a component perpendicular to the surface. So the induced fields are always tangential or along the surface. For example, the induced fields are in the shape of circles if the area over which time varying magnetic field acts is a circle.

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