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  1. Are the branching ratios of the Higgs boson decays consistent with the standard model?

  2. Is there only one type of Higgs boson?

  3. Why does it didn't have an electromagnetic field?

  4. why it has no spin ?

  5. Is the Higgs boson the only possible answer to the “mass problem”?

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closed as too broad by John Rennie, Qmechanic Jan 31 '17 at 9:20

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ These questions are easily Googleable. Can you give us some idea of what you have already done to research this and where you have found progress difficult? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jan 31 '17 at 9:07
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Are the branching ratios of the Higgs boson decays consistent with the standard model?

Yes, consistent within errors.

Is there only one type of Higgs boson?

In the standard model there is only one neutral Higgs. In extensions of the standard model there are more, and are being actively searched for at the new data of the LHC. See for example this link. We shall certainly hear of it if a statistically significant signal is found

Why does it didn't have any electromagnetic field?

In the standard model it is neutral. In extensions of the standard model there exist charged higgses, an example here.

after question was edited:

why it has no spin ?

The symmetry breaking mechanism used in the standard model and in many of its extensions, needs scalars for the mathematical model to fit the data.

Is the Higgs boson the only possible answer to the “mass problem”?

The "mass problem" is inherent in the formulation of the standard model. The SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) symmetries of the standard model are exact only for zero masses of the elementary particles. The observation of W and Z mesons with a specific mass create the "mass problem" in the pre-Higgs version of the standard model. The hypothesis of symmetry breaking which forced the inclusion of the Higgs mechanism solved the problem in the present standard model.

New theories are possible, but they have to embed the standard model as it is an encapsulation of an enormous number of measurements, and any new models have to fit the measurements.

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