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This question already has an answer here:

This might be more of a philosophical question, But I have to put this out there. Photons as we know it have no mass but carry energy, yet gravity is able to affect light. Here is my whole dilemma. What if gravity doesn't directly effect the mass of the object, but gravity acts on the energy of an object. We don't really see this though because almost all equations dealing with energy whether it be .5(m)v^2 mgh E=mc^2 all have mass in them. So again this is just a crazy out there idea of mine.

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marked as duplicate by Qmechanic Aug 31 '17 at 10:54

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The energy momentum tensor of general relativity does no have the masses, it has the four vectors of special relativity.

The stress–energy tensor (sometimes stress–energy–momentum tensor or energy–momentum tensor) is a tensor quantity in physics that describes the density and flux of energy and momentum in spacetime, generalizing the stress tensor of Newtonian physics. It is an attribute of matter, radiation, and non-gravitational force fields. The stress–energy tensor is the source of the gravitational field in the Einstein field equations of general relativity, just as mass density is the source of such a field in Newtonian gravity.

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