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Possible Duplicate:
Why is there no absolute maximum temperature?

On the Kelvin scale, absolute zero represents the temperature at which there is no thermal motion. Consequently, speaking of $-r$ Kelvin has no physical meaning for any positive real number $r$. My question is this: is there a value $k>0$ that is an upper bound for the Kelvin scale in the sense that speaking of $k+r$ Kelvin has no physical meaning for any positive real number $r$? Presumably there is such a $k$, based on "finite" energy, but is it so incomprehensibly large that it is no longer possible to distinguish between one level of largeness from another, say in the sense of Friedman.

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marked as duplicate by Martin Beckett, Alan Rominger, Colin K, dmckee Jun 22 '12 at 19:12

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