2
$\begingroup$

I have heard that temperature in space is very cold or near to -200 degree celsius in the side opposite to sun.How is this possible?If there are no or negligible amount of molecules in space,how can the term temperature be defined.I have been taught that temperature is just the vibration of molecules.If there are no molecules in space,is it plausible to say that space is neither hot nor cold,when you are exposed to space you feel neither hot nor cold?Please help me in simplest language.

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, sammy gerbil, heather, Community Jan 19 '17 at 2:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3
$\begingroup$

Before this gets killed as duplicate or what ever ... The temperature of space is the temperature due to photons. The universe has a temperature of $2.7K$, and near Earth shadowed from the sun photons in the solar system environment are around $30K$. This is due to ambient photons, from planets giving off heat and distant starlight etc.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.