2
$\begingroup$

Charge conservation is the principle that electric charge can neither be created nor destroyed. In electromagnetic field theory, vector calculus can be used to express the law in terms of charge density ρ (in coulombs per cubic meter) and electric current density $J$.

Charge conservation can also be understood as a consequence of symmetry through Noether's theorem, a central result in theoretical physics that asserts that each conservation law is associated with a symmetry of the underlying physics. The symmetry that is associated with charge conservation is the global gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. This is related to the fact that the electric and magnetic fields are not changed by different choices of the value representing the zero point of electrostatic potential.

Is there some experiment that shown if can possible some charge electron, or spin violation?

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Are you asking if any experiments have been done which demonstrated charge non-conservation, or are you asking whether there are experiments which have been designed to test/falsify charge conservation? $\endgroup$ – Bill N Jan 14 '17 at 4:44
  • $\begingroup$ second option which have been designed to test/falsify charge conservation $\endgroup$ – Super Sonic Jan 15 '17 at 6:29
4
$\begingroup$

A look through the wiki article answers your question

The best experimental tests of electric charge conservation are searches for particle decays that would be allowed if electric charge is not always conserved. No such decays have ever been seen. The best experimental test comes from searches for the energetic photon from an electron decaying into a neutrino and a single photon.

....

e → anything mean lifetime is greater than 6.4×10^24 years (68% CL)

n → p + ν + ν charge non-conserving decays are less than 8 × 10^−27 (68% CL) of all neutron decays[

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Think of the numbers of atoms that compose your body, its about $10^{27}$. Given that extremely large number, you would expect, say a violation of spin angular momentum, to be observable by some indirect effect, if the conservation law for spin was violated. But we don't observe any effect, electrons don't display anomalies in their behaviour. There are violations of other conservation laws, such as parity and neutrinos, involving the weak force, but not for the situation you have described.

I would be careful not to confine the word charge simply to electric charge, it is a generic term applicable to the properties of other particles.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ In quantum mechanics we can have macro effects so why number of atoms is so relevant ? Maybe, it can be a function of a quantum effects. But if you reverse the function you can set this experiment: macro effects may (in theory, only ipothesis) can change quantum effects if you change quantum modulation: why not ? $\endgroup$ – Super Sonic Jan 15 '17 at 6:33
-3
$\begingroup$

Charge conservation is the principle that electric charge can neither be created nor destroyed.

Yes, though it might be good to mention net charge. We can create charged particles in pair production and destroy them in annihilation.

In electromagnetic field theory, vector calculus can be used to express the law in terms of charge density ρ (in coulombs per cubic meter) and electric current density J.

Ah, but if ever you point to a law, somebody somewhere will be sure to break it.

Charge conservation can also be understood as a consequence of symmetry

And physics is full of broken symmetries.

through Noether's theorem, a central result in theoretical physics that asserts that each conservation law is associated with a symmetry of the underlying physics. The symmetry that is associated with charge conservation is the global gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. This is related to the fact that the electric and magnetic fields are not changed by different choices of the value representing the zero point of electrostatic potential.

But don't forget that the field is the electromagnetic field. An electric field is what you call it when you only see the linear force between charged particles, a magnetic field is what you call it when you only see the rotational force between charged particles.

Is there some experiment that shown if can possible some charge electron, or spin violation?

Not that I know of. But charge is related to spin and angular momentum. We usually think of angular momentum as being conserved. But if your spinning disc is smashed to pieces, parts fly away linearly in all directions. The angular momentum appears to have vanished. I expect that there will one day be some electromagnetic equivalent wherein charge is not conserved. Gamma-ray bursters may be of interest.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.