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Put an ordinary light bulb in front of a double slit and you will not observe interference due to the short coherent time compared with the observation time.

What about sound waves? What is the typical coherent time of sound waves? Is it usually much longer than the observation time?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "What is the typical coherent time of sound waves? Is it usually much longer than the observation time?" $\endgroup$
    – Yashas
    Commented Jan 13, 2017 at 14:09
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    $\begingroup$ @Yashas: I suspect OP is inquiring about coherence time but with sound waves instead of electromagnetic waves. $\endgroup$
    – Kyle Kanos
    Commented Jan 14, 2017 at 18:31

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Sound waves are macroscopic phenomena, and not affected by the quantum effects in the same way as the double slit experiment with light.

Sound waves do "degrade" in real life because when they travel through non-uniform media (e.g. in air, scattering may be caused by temperature gradients, convection currents, variations in humidity, etc) but at scales of a several wavelengths and cycles of vibration (which typically means distances of the order of meters and times of the order of seconds) the interference patterns are stable for as long as the sounds are being generated.

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