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earth(black to white)

Yesterday I made a few photos from ISS
and then made this aweseome gif out of them.

If one would go out at night, where are no disturbances of city lights, one would see a bright, black, starry sky above him. In some places little, white, dots would be brighter than the other ones, or even twinkling.But there is one "but" that is concerning me. If you look at the image above, you could see how black the earth actually is, but when you look at pictures as such: from google images

It makes me wonder if it is photoshoped or are there other cameras, that have kind of different filters or some kind of modes. In a gif that I made, you can't see even a bit of light where the cities are, but from the images given from google, you can see a beautiful scenery. And yes, the question is, are those images on google fake ? and if no, then why aren't the cameras from ISS taking such videos?

Then, when we look at a gif, in the background you could see a totally dark sky. not even a slightest star could be seen. In my opinion, it could be because the camera is focusing the earth and the object that is being not focused, is being blurred out, which remains only the dark background of a gif. Correct me if I am mistaken.

And to sum it up: If I would be in ISS right now, what would i see? I mean, would I see the stars like I see them when i look at the sky? Or would there be some kind of disturbances? And would I be able to see the cities, that are shining like shown in the google images ? (I would be glad if someone would show me some examples, and if possible maybe tell me something from your own experience).

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  • $\begingroup$ Note: we are quite bright. One of the many reasons telescopes are built far from cities is that cities generate so much light that the wash out the telescopes pictures! $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Jan 5 '17 at 3:54
  • $\begingroup$ In the space, measurements change from kilometers to light years. It is the same with telescope at earth and from the space. Even in the telescopes, we use filters to look at the moon. But what was concerning me, was what kind of filters do they use(if they use) and what is the purpose of them $\endgroup$ – LePython Jan 5 '17 at 10:25
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The google images may be embellished close-ups. Take a look at Nasa's Black Marble: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/earth-at-night.html I would think that the stars would appear better defined from the ISS because you are not looking through the atmosphere. It is not clear what part of the earth was your gif aimed at, and the camera appears to be aimed more towards the horizon and not down to earth...

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  • $\begingroup$ This was aimed at North America at that time. And actually there was an answer, that i was waiting, in the site you suggested to me and it said, that it was made possible with Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, which detects light and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals. $\endgroup$ – LePython Jan 5 '17 at 10:19

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