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I read somewhere that if we pack a proton and an electron together in a small volume, the combination does not attract or repel another electron or proton placed at a distance.

But my problem is that force on a charged particle due any other charged particle is not affected by any other placed near latter,i.e, the force between charged particles follows superposition rule. Then why the combination of a electron and an proton does not attract or repel any other charged particle?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you please give the reference? Or instead tell the whole paragraph and not just a part of it? $\endgroup$ – Aaryan Dewan Dec 26 '16 at 4:29
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The statement you're objecting to is describing the net force. You are correct that a far away electron will exert forces on both the electron and the proton, but those forces will be nearly equal and opposite, making them approximately cancel compared to the forces between the closely bound proton/electron. In reality, there will be a net attractive force because the electron will induce a polarization in the neutral hydrogen atom. If left alone, the electron and neutral hydrogen will eventually combine into a hydrogen anion.

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An electron and a positron close together will almost cancel their effects on a distant particle, but it is indeed a dipole.

If by “packed together” you mean they are in a bound state, then the positronium will consist of two orbitals in the same place overlapping exactly (assuming the ground state), just as in a normal hydrogen atom the center of the electron shell is also the center of the proton.

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