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In Quantum Field Theory, particles are high energy manifestations of excited Quantum Fields. According to Freeman Dyson, "Some ten or twenty different quantum fields exist. Each fills the whole of space and has its own particular properties. There is nothing else except these fields; the whole of the material universe is built of them." https://gravityandlevity.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/our-stability-is-but-balance-freeman-dyson-on-how-to-imagine-quantum-fields/ http://books.google.com/books?id=Iem53rmNYAIC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

According to current theory, matter that crosses a black hole's event horizon is eventually consumed by the hole's singularity. The particles that create matter are themselves derived from fluctuations within Quantum Fields; therefore, Quantum Fields obviously also enter black holes. Matter, particles and even light have insufficient energies to exit these holes but what about the quantum fields from which they are created? The Higgs Field apparently extends into and out of black holes. http://www.physicsforums.com/threads/is-higgs-field-present-everywhere.861292/

Higgs Field are able to leave these holes, but what about the other Quantum Fields? Are they consumed by the singularity or do they have sufficient energies to exit through the event horizon?

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  • $\begingroup$ From my question or from actual physical data and mathematics? $\endgroup$ – Richard Stanzak Dec 12 '16 at 17:15
  • $\begingroup$ I had hoped it was logical, if Higgs field can exit and quantum fields exist everywhere and are the basis of everything, it would seem logical that they enter black holes. I was wondering if they evaporate like Hawking Radiation or simply are unaffected by gravity therefore a black hole has no affect on them even if it warps space $\endgroup$ – Richard Stanzak Dec 12 '16 at 17:21
  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/937/2451 , physics.stackexchange.com/q/235253/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Dec 12 '16 at 19:31

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