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It has been demonstrated that it is possible to make humans hear sounds using waves.

Abstract From Journal of Applied Physiology

The intent of this paper is to bring a new phenomenon to the attention of physiologists. Using extremely low average power densities of electromagnetic energy, the perception of sounds was induced in normal and deaf humans. The effect was induced several hundred feet from the antenna the instant the transmitter was turned on, and is a function of carrier frequency and modulation. Attempts were made to match the sounds induced by electromagnetic energy and acoustic energy. The closest match occurred when the acoustic amplifier was driven by the rf transmitter's modulator. Peak power density is a critical factor and, with acoustic noise of approximately 80 db, a peak power density of approximately 275 mw/ cm2 is needed to induce the perception at carrier frequencies of 425 mc and 1,310 mc. The average power density can be at least as low as 400 μw/cm2. The evidence for the various possible sites of the electromagnetic energy sensor are discussed and locations peripheral to the cochlea are ruled out.

Is there a practical method for shielding? I mean using materials for simple attenuation, and/or altering characteristics of waves (frequency, phase and/or amplitude).

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  • $\begingroup$ Related physics.stackexchange.com/questions/297408/… $\endgroup$ – user108787 Dec 11 '16 at 14:07
  • $\begingroup$ Note that your abstract is from 1962 --- surely there is other literature in the past fifty-four years which refers to this research. (My guess is that if there was anything to it, it would be a well-known trick today, so probably it was debunked.) $\endgroup$ – rob Dec 11 '16 at 22:21
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A Faraday cage might not be the most practical solution, but would work as you require and would help confirm or deny whether humans sense EM radiation as described here.

*I've added a link since providing my answer for your convenience. Its explained here better than I can: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage

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  • $\begingroup$ I think this answer is fine: a Faraday cage is the most obvious way to shield against electromagnetic radiation, and there's a lot of literature on the subject. $\endgroup$ – rob Dec 11 '16 at 22:24

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